Your employer superannuation guarantee contributions

Your super is your money. Find out how it works.

Employers are generally required by law to contribute a compulsory 9.5% of Ordinary Time Earnings into super. These compulsory contributions are called Superannuation Guarantee (SG) contributions and they are are usually part of your salary package.

Ordinary Time Earnings includes earnings for:

  • ordinary hours of work
  • over-award payments, shift loading, commissions and bonuses
  • payments for leave taken.

Your employer is not legally required to pay super if you:

  • earn under $450 per calendar month, or
  • are under 18 and working 30 hours or less.

Superannuation Guarantee rates increases

From July 2014, the SG rate increased from 9.25% to 9.5%.

The Government legislated that the SG rate will remain at 9.5% for 7 years, increasing to 10% from July 2021, and eventually to 12% from July 2025.

The table below outlines the timeframe for the SG increase.

Financial year  SG rate
2013/14 9.25%
2014/15 9.5%
2015/16 9.5%
2016/17 9.5%
2017/18 9.5%
2018/19 9.5%
2019/20 9.5%
2020/21 9.5%
2021/22 10%
2022/23 10.5%
2023/24 11%
2024/25 11.5%
2025/26 and onwards 12% 


Tax on contributions

The great thing about SG contributions is that your employer pays them before your income tax is taken out.

While tax still applies, your SG contributions are taxed at concessional rates instead of at your marginal tax rate depending on what you earn.

For most people the concessional tax rate that applies is 15%. If you’re a high income earner and your combined income and concessional super contributions exceed $250,000 pa you will generally pay 30% tax on your super contributions - still significantly lower than the marginal tax rate that would apply if you received that money as income.


What if my employer’s not paying super?

Employers need to pay SG contributions at least quarterly. You can check yours by logging into your account, or by calling us on 1300 366 216.

If your employer is not paying your contributions, you should call the Australian Taxation Office’s Superannuation Helpline on 13 10 20.


Build your super faster

Try these tips for building your super faster.

Icon for consolidate Find and combine your super

If you have multiple funds, it's possible you’re paying multiple fees. Paying multiple fees can eat into your savings. 

Finding and combining your super, and keeping it in one account could save you on fees.

Icon for cash Add a bit more

You might like to consider:

Your super is your money. Find out how it works.

Employers are generally required by law to contribute a compulsory 9.5% of Ordinary Time Earnings into super. These compulsory contributions are called Superannuation Guarantee (SG) contributions and they are are usually part of your salary package.

Ordinary Time Earnings includes earnings for:

  • ordinary hours of work
  • over-award payments, shift loading, commissions and bonuses
  • payments for leave taken.

Your employer is not legally required to pay super if you:

  • earn under $450 per calendar month, or
  • are under 18 and working 30 hours or less.

Superannuation Guarantee rates increases

From July 2014, the SG rate increased from 9.25% to 9.5%.

The Government legislated that the SG rate will remain at 9.5% for 7 years, increasing to 10% from July 2021, and eventually to 12% from July 2025.

The table below outlines the timeframe for the SG increase.

Financial year  SG rate
2013/14 9.25%
2014/15 9.5%
2015/16 9.5%
2016/17 9.5%
2017/18 9.5%
2018/19 9.5%
2019/20 9.5%
2020/21 9.5%
2021/22 10%
2022/23 10.5%
2023/24 11%
2024/25 11.5%
2025/26 and onwards 12% 


Tax on contributions

The great thing about SG contributions is that your employer pays them before your income tax is taken out.

While tax still applies, your SG contributions are taxed at concessional rates instead of at your marginal tax rate depending on what you earn.

For most people the concessional tax rate that applies is 15%. If you’re a high income earner and your combined income and concessional super contributions exceed $250,000 pa you will generally pay 30% tax on your super contributions - still significantly lower than the marginal tax rate that would apply if you received that money as income.


What if my employer’s not paying super?

Employers need to pay SG contributions at least quarterly. You can check yours by logging into your account, or by calling us on 1300 366 216.

If your employer is not paying your contributions, you should call the Australian Taxation Office’s Superannuation Helpline on 13 10 20.


Build your super faster

Try these tips for building your super faster.

Icon for consolidate Find and combine your super

If you have multiple funds, it's possible you’re paying multiple fees. Paying multiple fees can eat into your savings. 

Finding and combining your super, and keeping it in one account could save you on fees.

Icon for cash Add a bit more

You might like to consider: